June 6, 2018 | Madison Elliott

VSS 2018 Highlights Part II – St. Pete Beach, FL

We’re collecting posters and talk slides from other Vis-related presentations from this year’s VSS. This post will be continually updated as we receive and post them!

Talks

Attentional Selection of Multiple Correlation Ensembles
Madison Elliott & Ron Rensink

Posters

Effects of title wording on memory of trends in line graphs
Anelise Newman, Zoya Bylinskii, Steve Haroz, Spandan Madan, Fredo Durand, Aude Oliva

Interpreting color-coding systems: the effects of concept activation on color inference
Kathleen Foley, Laurent Lessard, Karen B. Schloss


June 6, 2018 | Madison Elliott

VSS 2018 Highlights Part I – St. Pete Beach, FL

We organized a symposium: Vision and Visualization- Inspiring Novel Research Directions in Vision Science

We’ve posted slides from the 4 presenters, as well as the original description from our submission below…

Talk Slides

Information visualization and the study of visual perception
(Ron Rensink)

Where do people look on data visualizations?
(Aude Oliva & Zoya Bylinskii)

Segmentation, structure, and shape perception in data visualizations
(Steven Franconeri)

Color Perception in Data Visualizations
(Danielle Szafir)

Image uploaded from iOS-2 (1)

Symposium Description

Data is ubiquitous in the modern world, and its communication, analysis, and interpretation are critical scientific issues. Visualizations leverage the capabilities of the visual system, allowing us to intuitively explore and generate novel understandings of data in ways that fully-automated approaches cannot. Visualization research builds an empirical framework around design guidelines, perceptual evaluation of design techniques, and a basic understanding of the visual processes associated with viewing data displays. Vision science offers the methodologies and phenomena that can provide foundational insight into these questions. Challenges in visualization map directly to many vision science topics, such as finding data of interest (visual search), estimating data means and variance (ensemble coding), and determining optimal display properties (crowding, salience, color perception). Given the growing interest in psychological work that advances basic knowledge and allows for immediate translation, visualization provides an exciting new context for vision scientists to confirm existing hypotheses and explore new questions. This symposium will illustrate how interdisciplinary work across vision science and visualization simultaneously improves visualization techniques while advancing our understanding of the visual system, and inspire new research opportunities at the intersection of these two fields.

Historically, the crossover between visualization and vision science relied heavily on canonical findings, but this has changed significantly in recent years. Visualization work has recently incorporated and iterated on newer vision research, and the results has been met with great excitement from both sides (e.g., Rensink & Baldridge, 2010; Haroz & Whitney, 2012; Harrison et al., 2014; Borkin et al., 2016; Szafir et al., 2016). Unfortunately, very little of this work is presented regularly at VSS, and there is currently no dedicated venue for collaborative exchanges between the two research communities. This symposium showcases the current state of vision science and visualization research integration, and aspires to make VSS a home for future exchanges. Visualization would benefit from sampling a wider set of vision topics and methods, while vision scientists would gain a new real-world context that simultaneously provokes insight about the visual system and holds translational impact.

Ron, Danielle, Cindy, Madison, Christie, and Steve.


December 10, 2017 | Madison Elliott

Our IEEE Vis Panel in Media

Watch our full panel video, now available on Vimeo: link here.

Check out the Data Stories podcast review of IEEE Vis here. Jessica Hullman discusses our panel @ 47:24.

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December 10, 2017 | Madison Elliott

Danielle Szafir appears on the Forbes 30 under 30 list for Science!

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Congratulations Danielle! Read her profile here 🙂


December 1, 2017 | Madison Elliott

OPAM Highlights – Vancouver, BC

Steve Franconeri hosted a great interdisciplinary panel:

Discover Pasteur’s Quadrant: Four research communities that will inspire your work”. (FYI- we’re expecting video + slides to be posted on the OPAM website sometime soon- for now, find a link to the program here).

Tamara Munzner‘s panel talk, “Data Visualization as a Driver for Visual Cognition Research“, was declared (by the OPAM keynoter Jeremy Wolfe) to open millennia-worth of dissertation material for visioneers. Find her slides here!

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November 2, 2017 | Madison Elliott

Vis Highlights 2017 – Phoenix, AZ

We Hosted a Meetup: Vision Science at InfoVis

Presenters shared lightning talks about their latest work at the intersection of vision science and visualization!

Abstract archives and presentation slides can be found here:

Presenter Name Topic
Fumeng Yang Correlation Judgment
David Burlinson Open vs Closed Shapes
Maureen Stone Color Design for Tableau 10
Steve Haroz From Spatial Frequencies to ISOTYPE
Alex Kale Uncertainty in Visualizations
Nam Wook Kim BubbleView
Zoya Bylinskii Predicting Attention for Design Feedback
Christie Nothelfer How Do We Read Line Charts?
Madison Elliott Task Demands Affect Feature Selection

We also hosted the Panel: Vision Science Meets Visualization

Read our full panel submission with abstracts here!

Panelist Bios and Talk Slides:

Rosenholtz

Peripheral Vision and Usability

Ruth Rosenholtz is a Principal Research Scientist in MIT’s Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, and a member of CSAIL. She has a B.S. in Engineering from Swarthmore College, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in EECS from UC Berkeley. Her lab studies human vision, including visual search, perceptual organization, visual clutter, and peripheral vision. Her work focuses on developing predictive computational models of visual processing, and applying such models to design of user interfaces and information visualizations. She joined MIT in 2003 after 7 years at the Palo Alto Research Center (formerly Xerox PARC).

Rensink

Visualization and Vision Science.

Ronald Rensink is an Associate Professor in the departments of Computer Science and Psychology at the University of British Columbia (UBC). His research interests include visual perception (especially visual attention), information visualization and visual analytics. He obtained a PhD in Computer Science from UBC in 1992, followed by a postdoc in Psychology at Harvard University, and then several years as a scientist at Cambridge Basic Research, an MIT-Nissan lab in Cambridge MA. He is currently part of the UBC Cognitive Systems Program, an interdisciplinary program combining Computer Science, Linguistics, Philosophy, and Psychology.

Franconeri_Steven_111214

Steven Franconeri is Professor of Psychology at Northwestern University, and Director of the Northwestern Cognitive Science Program. His lab studies visual thinking, graph comprehension, and data visualization. He completed his Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology at Harvard University with a National Defense Science and Engineering Fellowship, followed by a Killam Postdoctoral Fellowship at UBC. He has received the Psychonomics Early Career Award and an NSF CAREER award, and his work is funded by the NSF, NIH, and the Department of Education.

KarenSchlossHeadshot

A Color Inference Approach to Interpreting Colors in Information Visualization.

Karen Schloss is an Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin – Madison in the Department of Psychology and Wisconsin Institute for Discovery. Her Visual Perception and Cognition Lab studies color cognition, information visualization, perceptual organization, and navigation in virtual environments. She received her BA from Barnard College, Columbia University in 2005, with a major in Psychology and a minor in Architecture. She completed her Ph.D. in Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley in 2011 and continued on as a Postdoctoral Scholar from 2011-2013. She spent three years as an Assistant Professor of Research in the Department of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences at Brown University before joining the faculty at UW – Madison in 2016.

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The visXvision organizers at dinner with Ruth Rosenholtz in our hotel’s rotating restaurant 🙂

May 23, 2017 | Madison Elliott

InfoVis at VSS! – St. Pete, Florida

We hosted our first event on May 23, 2017: an informal VSS satellite meeting for vision science researchers to learn about and discuss the field of information visualization!

The meeting began with a presentation about what InfoVis research is like, and why cognitive psychologists might care about it. Next, research talks were given by Madison Elliott, Cindy Xiong, Christie Nothelfer, Danielle Albers-Szafir, and Zoya Bylinskii, who all conduct research at the intersection of visualization and vision science. The meeting concluded with a round table introduction, discussion, and contact/idea exchange. Hopefully this meeting was the start of many more collaborative events!

Talks:

  • Changing task demands limits feature based attention. Madison Elliott & Ron Rensink (University of British Columbia).
  • Curse of knowledge in visual data communication. Cindy Xiong & Steve Franconeri (Northwestern University).
  • Rapid feature-selection benefits from feature redundancy. Christie Nothelfer & Steve Franconeri (Northwestern University).
  • Designing for data and vision: ensembles, constancy, and color models. Danielle Albers Szafir (University of Colorado – Boulder).
  • How studying the perception of visualizations is like studying the perception of scenes. Zoya Bylinskii & Aude Oliva (Massachusetts Institute of Technology).

Slides from opening talk available here: VSS_InfoVis

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